Recovering Ubuntu After Installing Windows

Solution for recovering Boot loader after installing Windows

Hi Linux users,
Most of us have faced this problem. Whenever we install Windows operating system after installing Linux, Linux os will no longer be detected by your pc or laptop. This is because of boot loader. The Windows boot loader will overwrite the Linux bootloader which will not detect the Linux System. This article will help you to recover your Linux bootlaoder which will detect all the operating systems. All you need is just the corresponding Linux cd. Here i specified for Ubuntu(Debian)

Using the Ubuntu CD (Recommended)

  • The graphical way

Insert your Ubuntu CD, reboot your computer and set it to boot from CD in the BIOS and boot into a live session. You can also use a LiveUSB if you have created one in the past.

Install and run Boot-Repair
After this, click “Recommended repair” and apply. If you are willing to use the advanced options, make sure you leave the “Reinstall GRUB” checkbox ticked.
Now reboot your system. The usual GRUB boot menu should appear. If it does not, hold Left Shift while booting. You will be able to choose between Ubuntu and Windows.

  • The terminal way

* Open a terminal. As of Ubuntu 11.10 and 11.04, this can be done by opening the Unity Dash (you can click the Ubuntu logo in the top panel or use the Windows key on your keyboard) and typing in “Terminal”, and clicking what comes up. On earlier versions, you can achieve this by going to Applications -> Accessories -> Terminal.

You are then presented with a standard bash prompt, type:

sudo grub-install /dev/XXX

where XXX is the device of your Ubuntu install. (eg: grub-install /dev/sdb). Hint: You can also use /dev/disk/by-label/ if the partition you installed on has a label. You can determine the /dev node for such a device by running:

ls -l /dev/disk/by-label/

This will give the output of something like:

lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 Oct 16 10:27 data -> ../../sdb2
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 Oct 16 10:27 data2 -> ../../sda2
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 Oct 16 10:27 fat -> ../../sda6
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 Oct 16 10:27 home -> ../../sda7
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 Oct 16 10:27 root -> ../../sda1
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 Oct 16 10:27 swap -> ../../sda5
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 10 Oct 16 10:27 windows -> ../../sdb1

From here, find only the drive name, ignore the partition number, that is, for partitions labeled “root”, “data2”, “fat”, “home” and “swap” it’s all still just sda. This is due to the fact that GRUB is installed in the MBR of the drive, and not on a partition.

Now reboot your system. The usual GRUB boot menu should appear. If it does not, hold Left Shift while booting. You will be able to choose between Ubuntu and Windows.

  • Using the Ubuntu Alternate CD

Boot your system from the Ubuntu Alternate CD.

When the Ubuntu splash screen comes up with the boot: prompt, type in rescue and press enter.
Choose your language, location (country) and then keyboard layout as if you were doing a fresh install.
Enter a host name, or leave it with the default (Ubuntu).

At this stage you are presented with a screen where you can select which partition is your root partition (there is a list of the partitions on your hard drive, so you are required to know which partition number Ubuntu is on). This will be dev/discs/discY/partX, where the X is a partition number and Y is the number of the drive.
Now proceed as described in “The terminal way” above.

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